Feasibility of a Community Pharmacist Intervention for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Author(s): ,
Helen Marin
Affiliations:
BSc MSc
,
Yazid AlHamarneh
Affiliations:
PhD
,
Ross Tsuyuki
Affiliations:
BScPharm PharmD MSc
,
Adrian Wagg
Affiliations:
MB BS FRCP FRCP(E) FHEA (M
,
Kathleen Hunter
Affiliations:
PhD RN NP GNC(C) NCA
,
Martha Spencer
Affiliations:
MD
Jane Shulz
Affiliations:
MD
Canadian Pharmacists Conference ePoster Library. Sadowski C. Jun 4, 2017; 174271
Dr. Cheryl Sadowski
Dr. Cheryl Sadowski
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Abstract
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Objectives
Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common in older adults, but it has not been studied if pharmacists can assess and provide care for this syndrome. To assess the feasibility of a community pharmacist assessment and intervention in patients with LUTS.

Methods
This prospective pilot study involved one community pharmacy site where older adults (minimum age 60 years) were recruited. These subjects were screened for presence of LUTS, then underwent an interview (that recorded demographics, lifestyle and behavioural issues affecting bladder function, LUTS symptoms and bother, attempted interventions). All subjects completed 3 bladder validated bladder questionnaires, with the primary measure being the Patient Perception of Bladder Condition (PPBC). Subjects were randomized to intervention or control (usual care). The intervention included tailored recommendations to address the LUTS (based on a previously published guideline), a 3-week follow-up phone call, and repeated 6-week visit and repeat of the questionnaires. The control group received no recommendations for LUTS, but did receive a healthy aging brochure. The control had a 6-week follow-up visit repeating the questionnaires. Feasibility included documentation, time, billing, and pharmacist and patient acceptance.

Results
A total of 16 subjects were enrolled (8 control, 8 intervention). Eight controls and 6 intervention subjects had complete follow-up at 6 weeks. The study was not powered to show a difference in questionnaire scores, but there was a trend to improvement in the intervention group in the PPBC. Most interventions focused on lifestyle (e.g., fluid consumption) and behavioural changes (e.g., scheduled toileting). The mean time spent with each subject was 23.8 minutes (SD 12.1). Eight subjects had interactions that could be billed. The biggest barrier in the process was patient embarrassment discussing LUTS.

Conclusion
A community-based pharmacist intervention to address LUTS was feasible and could potentially lead to improvements in patient outcomes.

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