Use of Aggregate Medication Incident Information by Community Pharmacies
Author(s): ,
Lisa Tay
Affiliations:
MSc
,
Todd A Boyle
Affiliations:
PhD
,
Emily McPhee
Affiliations:
Bsc
,
Andrea Bishop
Affiliations:
PhD
,
Certina Ho
Affiliations:
PhD
,
Thomas Mahaffey
Affiliations:
PhD
,
Bobbi Morrison
Affiliations:
PhD
,
Andrea Murphey
Affiliations:
PharmD
Neil MacKinnon
Affiliations:
PhD
Canadian Pharmacists Conference ePoster Library. Barker J. Jun 4, 2017; 174259
Prof. James R. Barker
Prof. James R. Barker
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Abstract
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Objectives
To explore the uptake and use of aggregate medication incident (MI) information (i.e., summaries of MIs occurring elsewhere) in community pharmacies.

Methods
Semi-structured interviews were conducted using a convenience sample of 15 community pharmacy managers in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The study focused on community pharmacy use of aggregate MI information provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada (ISMP Canada), including information available through the online Community Pharmacist Incident Reporting (CPhIR) system. Interview questions elicited participant feedback on: (1) how the pharmacy accesses aggregate MI information (i.e., specific sources accessed); (2) how the pharmacy uses the aggregate MI information available to them; and (3) what barriers inhibit the use of aggregate information to enhance patient safety. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis.

Results
No common source for accessing aggregate MI information was identified. Pharmacies more commonly used CPhIR to explore their own data rather than the different aggregate level reports available. When accessed, variable approaches were used to disseminate aggregate MI information, ranging from acting on an MI right away to discussing them at quarterly meetings. Four overarching themes emerged regarding barriers to the uptake of aggregate MI information: (1) competing sources of information; (2) inability to identify relevant information quickly; (3) difficulty matching the information to the specific need; and (4) general time constraints

Conclusion
While pharmacies use aggregate MI information to enhance patient safety, lack of time, lack of knowledge about where to get information, and lack of tailored information for the community pharmacy context limit its potential benefits. Results indicate a need for increased awareness (e.g., what sources will benefit the pharmacy), reduced information overload (e.g., simplifying and streamlining access), and enhanced information customization (e.g., increased focus on community pharmacies).

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