Sex and Gender-Based Analysis in Pharmacy Practice Research
Author(s): ,
Nancy Waite
Affiliations:
PharmD
,
Emily Milne
Affiliations:
PhD
,
Martin Cooke
Affiliations:
PhD
,
Katie Cook
Affiliations:
MA
,
Feng Chang
Affiliations:
PharmD
Beth Sproule
Affiliations:
PharmD
Canadian Pharmacists Conference ePoster Library. McCarthy L. Jun 3, 2017; 174247
Dr. Lisa McCarthy
Dr. Lisa  McCarthy
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Abstract
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Objectives
Many health outcomes are potentially affected by both biological differences associated with sex, and by socio-cultural processes connected to gender. We sought to understand the extent to which sex-gender based analysis (SGBA) is included in pharmacy practice research.

Methods
Scoping review of English-language studies identified through search of MEDLINE, Embase, International Pharmacy Abstracts (IPA), and CINAHL (inception to Jan 2014). Two raters independently screened citations to identify titles and abstracts that included key words related to sex or gender and studies that could be categorized as pharmacy practice research. One author extracted data from included studies related to study design, population, intervention/exposure and outcomes, with results reviewed by a second author. All authors reviewed eligible articles to categorize them according a previously-developed typology, and to assess four criteria: 1) the inclusion of sex or gender in research objectives, 2) the depth of sex/gender analysis incorporated into study designs and reporting, 3) the inclusion of sex or gender considerations in interpretation of study results, 4) the intentional and accurate use of sex/gender language.

Results
Of 458 unique search results, six articles met the inclusion eligibility criteria. Two of these six publications were considered to have included sex/gender considerations in a model consistent with SGBA as described by Hammarström. Three of the six studies inaccurately applied sex and gender terminology, whereas the two studies that featured sex or gender in their primary research question did use these terms appropriately.

Conclusion
Despite increasing attention on sex-gender based considerations by policy makers and research funding agencies, there was a paucity of pharmacy practice research publications that conducted SGBA. This presents the pharmacy practice research community with an opportunity to explore questions related to SGBA and intersectionality and to support international efforts to increase inclusion of sex/gender considerations in health research.

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